À la Récherche du Temps Perdu
Remembrance of Things Past
In Search of Lost Time
 

May 27, 2008

A la Fin du Temps Perdu

[Since it seems this blog has gotten a bit more attention recently and the final post was posted to my main site rather than to this blog, I'm cross-posting it here.]

I'll try not to give away too much here, but the multiyear Proust reading has come to an end, even if the blog hasn't. Since this isn't an in-depth analysis but only my own reaction on finishing what is the longest book I've ever read (I can't think of anything else that even comes close), I'm putting it on the main page. For you all who haven't finished it, I don't think there is much in the way of spoilers below, but it's about finishing the book, so caveat emptor.

This is a very personal book. Towards the end, Proust describes a work of literary art as being an edifice built around the writer, to be seen and interpreted by visitors from the outside. There are works of fiction that don't take this stance, works that attempt to generalize over all of life and speak in universals. In this view, the author is merely a conduit for a noumenal world. Shakespeare, of course, falls into this category, as do Dostoevsky, Homer, Melville, Faulkner. But Proust is very explicit that the vision he is projecting is a mirror of his own mind and little else, not that he needs to be explicit about it. In many ways Proust is as hermetic as Kafka or Kleist in his unshakeable devotion to his own perspective. It's apparent that the problems he faces--and the ultimate answers he arrives at--are ones quite specific to himself and his own situation; i.e., that of a brilliant writer in active society.

That Proust's excavation is so complete and so brilliant makes the work paradoxical. As I had been told by friends, Proust ends on a high, bringing together many threads from earlier in the work, and the feeling on finishing is one of satisfaction and completeness. It is the opposite of Musil's The Man Without Qualities, which embraces the world and everything in it only to shatter and fall apart, because Musil's world expanded and mutated faster than his book. But the paradox makes leaving Proust an ambivalent experience. On finishing his work, I did not feel as though I was carrying the entirety of the book with me in my head (though I have assimilated parts of it quite thoroughly). Rather, it was like leaving a cathedral and having the doors shut behind you.

I held off reading the end for about a week, precisely because I knew that finishing it would mean leaving Proust's world. Proust never had to deal with that problem; even having written the end, the refinement of the gigantic middle could have easily been stretched to accommodate far more days than he had. The polar emotions that greeted me at the end were comfortable satisfaction at being at the brilliant summit of the end of the book, followed by the blinding readjustment that you have on walking out of a dark theater into the sunlight. And then the question, "Well, what do I read next?" (A: I think it has to be Beckett.)

Is it, in the words of an old professor, the greatest thing ever written? I can't say that it is, because part of me feels that admitting that would be to narrow the scope of my world to that of Proust's. But is it the greatest success ever written, a book that sets out very specific terms and fulfills them beyond any expectation, comparable to Joyce or Kant? Possibly.

Posted by at 08:16 PM May 27, 2008